Tony Curtis Movies

Want to know the best Tony Curtis movies?  How about the worst Tony Curtis movies?  Curious about Dana Andrews box office grosses or which Tony Curtis movie picked up the most Oscar® nominations? Need to know which Tony Curtis movie got the best reviews from critics and audiences and which got the worst reviews? Well you have come to the right place….because we have all of that information.

Tony Curtis (1925-2010) was an Oscar®-nominated American actor whose career spanned over 7 decades.  His IMDb page shows 128 acting credits from 1949-2008. This page will rank 61 Tony Curtis movies from Best to Worst in six different sortable columns of information. Television shows, shorts, cameos and movies that were not released in theaters were not included in the rankings.  This page was requested many moons ago by Dan and many other people.

Tony Curtis in 1959’s Some Like It Hot

Tony Curtis Movies Can Be Ranked 6 Ways In This Table

The really cool thing about this table is that it is “user-sortable”. Rank the movies anyway you want.

  • Sort Tony Curtis movies by co-stars of his movies.
  • Sort Tony Curtis movies by adjusted domestic box office grosses using current movie ticket cost (in millions)
  • Sort Tony Curtis movies by yearly domestic box office rank
  • Sort Tony Curtis movies how they were received by critics and audiences.  60% rating or higher should indicate a good movie.
  • Sort by how many Oscar® nominations each Tony Curtis movie received and how many Oscar® wins each Tony Curtis movie won.
  • Sort Tony Curtis movies by Ultimate Movie Rankings (UMR) Score.  UMR Score puts box office, reviews and awards into a mathematical equation and gives each movie a score.
RankMovie (Year)UMR Co-Star LinksAdj. B.O. Domestic (mil)Box Office Rank by YearCritic Audience RatingOscar Nom / WinUMR Score
Spartacus (1960)Kirk Douglas & Laurence Olivier$387.503rd of 196088.00%06 / 0478.41
Some Like It Hot (1959)Jack Lemmon & Marilyn Monroe$326.303rd of 195991.67%06 / 0178.33
Great Race, The (1965)Jack Lemmon & Natalie Wood$254.606th of 196574.00%05 / 0169.00
Operation Petticoat (1959)Cary Grant$374.204th of 196077.33%01 / 0067.75
Defiant Ones, The (1958)Sidney Poitier$110.4028th of 195879.00%09 / 0267.04
Vikings, The (1958)Kirk Douglas & Ernest Borgnine$252.205th of 195870.50%00 / 0064.14
Trapeze (1956)Burt Lancaster$318.303rd of 195663.50%00 / 0060.84
Boston Strangler, The (1968)Henry Fonda$147.1013th of 196876.50%00 / 0058.76
Winchester '73 (1950)James Stewart & Rock Hudson$112.9035th of 195087.33%00 / 0058.55
Sweet Smell of Success (1957)Burt Lancaster$96.8039th of 195789.00%00 / 0056.83
Francis (1950)Donald O'Connor$145.5013th of 195065.50%00 / 0053.33
Captain Newman, M.D. (1963)Gregory Peck$112.0024th of 196371.33%03 / 0052.09
Great Imposter, The (1961)Karl Malden$97.6036th of 196175.50%00 / 0050.61
Rat Race, The (1960)Debbie Reynolds$118.7019th of 196065.50%00 / 0049.18
40 Pounds Of Trouble (1962)Phil Silvers$86.7038th of 196375.50%00 / 0048.92
Taras Bulba (1962)Yul Brynner$109.2030th of 196367.00%01 / 0048.82
Kings Go Forth (1958)Frank Sinatra$112.4027th of 195866.50%00 / 0048.68
Goodbye Charlie (1964)Walter Matthau & Debbie Reynolds$91.0020th of 196570.00%00 / 0047.00
Sex and the Single Girl (1964)Henry Fonda & Natalie Wood$108.9015th of 196462.50%00 / 0046.26
Houdini (1953)Janet Leigh$76.6067th of 195370.00%00 / 0044.77
City Across The River (1949)Thelma Ritter$81.7086th of 194967.00%00 / 0044.15
Who Was That Lady? (1960)Dean Martin & Janet Leigh$108.2024th of 196057.50%00 / 0043.79
Black Shield of Falworth, The (1954)Janet Leigh$94.2060th of 195460.00%00 / 0042.80
Boeing, Boeing (1965)Jerry Lewis$67.0039th of 196667.50%00 / 0042.10
Perfect Furlough, The (1958)Janet Leigh$92.3042nd of 195955.00%00 / 0040.78
Six Bridges To Cross (1955)Sal Mineo$83.4070th of 195557.00%00 / 0039.72
List of Adrian Messenger, The (1963)George C. Scott & Directed by John Huston$44.8061st of 196369.50%00 / 0039.60
So This Is Paris (1954)Gloria DeHaven$78.5086th of 195557.50%00 / 0039.19
Beachhead (1954)Frank Lovejoy$73.3075th of 195459.00%00 / 0039.09
Prince Who Was A Thief, The (1951)Piper Laurie$71.1082nd of 195159.00%00 / 0038.75
Square Jungle, The (1956)Ernest Borgnine$43.80107th of 195666.50%00 / 0038.05
Lady Gambles, The (1949)Barbara Stanwyck$59.90114th of 194959.00%00 / 0037.01
Sierra (1950)Audie Murphy$42.30100th of 195064.50%00 / 0036.88
Outsider, The (1961)James Franciscus$24.60121st of 196170.00%00 / 0036.71
Johnny Dark (1954)Piper Laurie$76.2070th of 195452.50%00 / 0036.48
Kansas Raiders (1950)Audie Murphy$60.20111th of 195156.50%00 / 0035.89
Mirror Crack'd, The (1980)Elizabeth Taylor & Rock Hudson$41.5058th of 198062.50%00 / 0035.81
Paris When It Sizzles (1964)Audrey Hepburn & William Holden$51.2046th of 196459.00%00 / 0035.67
Rawhide Years, The (1955)Arthur Kennedy$46.30106th of 195657.00%00 / 0033.97
Purple Mask, The (1955)Colleen Miller$44.30122nd of 195557.00%00 / 0033.66
Wild and Wonderful (1964)Christine Kaufmann$51.2050th of 196454.00%00 / 0033.32
Those Daring Young Men in Their Jaunty Jalopies (1969)Bourvil$19.0079th of 196963.50%00 / 0032.78
Mister Cory (1957)Martha Hyer$43.0095th of 195754.50%00 / 0032.28
Little Miss Marker (1980)Walter Matthau$20.5079th of 198061.50%00 / 0032.08
Johnny Stool Pidgeon (1949)Shelly Winters$24.10139th of 194060.00%00 / 0031.94
Flesh and Fury (1952)Jan Sterling$26.60143rd of 195259.00%00 / 0031.85
Midnight Story, The (1957)Marisa Pavan$35.50126th of 195756.00%00 / 0031.82
No Room For The Groom (1952)Piper Laurie$34.70120th of 195256.00%00 / 0031.70
Forbidden (1953)Joanne Dru$26.20133rd of 195358.50%00 / 0031.55
Don't Make Waves (1967)Claudia Cardinale$21.6074th of 196759.50%00 / 0031.31
Son of Ali Baba (1952)Piper Laurie$53.2097th of 195248.50%00 / 0031.05
Not With My Wife, You Don't (1966)George C. Scott$17.2094th of 196655.50%00 / 0029.37
I Was A Shoplifter (1950)Rock Hudson$31.40136th of 195051.00%00 / 0028.84
Last Tycoon, The (1976)Robert DeNiro & Robert Mitchum$13.8093rd of 197653.50%01 / 0027.68
All American, The (1953)Lori Nelson$21.90138th of 195351.50%00 / 0027.59
Suppose They Gave a War and Nobody Came? (1970)Ernest Borgnine$10.40108th of 197054.00%00 / 0026.99
Naked in New York (1994)Eric Stoltz$2.10191st of 199452.00%00 / 0024.77
Lepke (1975)Anjanette Comer$10.30135th of 197549.00%00 / 0024.63
Manitou, The (1978)Susan Strasberg$11.6095th of 197848.50%00 / 0024.60
Bad News Bears Go to Japan, The (1978)Jackie Earle Haley$25.6042nd of 197831.00%00 / 0018.54
Sextette (1978)Mae West$12.80113th of 197828.00%00 / 0015.14

Stats and Possibly Interesting Things From The Above Tony Curtis Table

  1. Sixteen Tony Curtis movies crossed the magical $100 million domestic gross mark.  That is a percentage of 26.23% of his movies listed. Spartacus (1960) was easily his biggest box office hit when looking at adjusted domestic box office gross.
  2. An average Tony Curtis movie grosses $85.80 million in adjusted box office gross.
  3. Using RottenTomatoes.com’s 60% fresh meter.  31 of Tony Curtis movies are rated as good movies…or 50.81% of his movies. Some Like It Hot (1959) is his highest rated movie while Sextette (1978) was his lowest rated movie.
  4. Eight Tony Curtis movies received at least one Oscar® nomination in any category…..or 13.11% of his movies.
  5. Four Tony Curtis movies won at least one Oscar® in any category…..or 6.55% of his movies.
  6. An average Ultimate Movie Rankings (UMR) Score is 40.00. 25 Tony Curtis movies scored higher than that average….or 40.98% of his movies. Spartacus (1960) got the the highest UMR Score (just barely over Some Like It Hot)  while Sextette (1978) got the lowest UMR Score.

Tony Curtis in 1958’s The Vikings

Ten Possibly Interesting Facts About Tony Curtis

1. Bernard Schwartz was born in the Bronx, New York in 1925.

2. How Bernard Schwartz became Tony Curtis?  The first name was from the novel Anthony Adverse and “Curtis” was from Kurtz. a surname in his mother’s family. In Curtis’ first film roles, he was credited as “Anthony Curtis”….which was quickly shortened to “Tony Curtis”.

3. Tony Curtis joined the United States Navy after the attack on Pearl Harbor.  He joined the Pacific submarine force after he was inspired by Cary Grant in Destination Tokyo and Tyrone Power in Crash Dive.   Curtis witnessed the Japanese surrender in Tokyo Bay from his ship’s (USS Proteus) signal bridge about a mile away.

4. After World War 2 ended, Tony Curtis attended City College of New York and studied acting at The New School.  His contemporaries included Elaine Stritch, Harry Belafonte, Walter Matthau, Beatrice Arthur, and Rod Steiger.

5. Tony Curtis was quickly discovered by talent agent Joyce Selznick (niece of David O. Selznick)He arrived in Hollywood at the age of 23.

6. Tony Quigley was voted as a Top 25 Box Office star 5 times on Quigley Publications’ annual poll: 1954 (23rd), 1959 (18th), 1960 (6th), 1961 (9th) and 1962 (18th).

7. Tony Curtis broke a Hollywood taboo in the 1950s by insisting that an African-American actor, Sidney Poitier, have co-starring billing next to him in the movie 1958’s The Defiant Ones.

8. Tony Curtis was married six times…..he had six children.  One of his children is Jamie Lee Curtis.

9. Tony Curtis’ favorite actor was Cary Grant.  His favorite movie was Grant’s Gunga Din.

10. Tony Curtis was buried with some of his favorite possessions – a Stetson hat, an Armani scarf, driving gloves, an iPhone and a copy of his favorite novel, Anthony Adverse.

Check out Tony Curtis’ career compared to current and classic actors.  Most 100 Million Dollar Movies of All-Time.

Academy Award® and Oscar® are the registered trademarks of the Academy of Motion Arts and Sciences.

Editor’s note:  Calculating adjusted is not an exact science.  Most of our calculations are based on solid sources that we have collected over the years.  A few of his early 1950s low budget movies required us to use biographies, movie books, articles and other sources that do not provide the best statistics.   So please keep that in mind when you are looking at the grosses of some of his low budget B movies.

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44 thoughts on “Tony Curtis Movies

  1. Happy Birthday to Coger and son. Hope your day is awesome. Don’t worry I am not good at match so I will not be able to figure out that Cogerson is 50. 🙂

  2. Hey Bob…..thanks for the comment on Tony Curtis. Ah….the year 1954….the archive Variety magazines do not have the Top Grossers page…which is a shame….I remember being all excited…but when I got to the proper page it was missing…..talk about disappointment….an e-mail to Variety did not help at all. I bring this up…because…when it comes to The Black Shield of Falworth….it is possible it earned a little bit more money….as my records go down to 2.00 million in rentals….but I am missing many movies that had rental numbers of 1 million…which Falworth falls in that category. Another source says Falworth was one of Universal’s bigger hits…..and mention one of their hits being 1.60 million in rentals and that Falworth did better…..so face with a minimum of $1.61 and a maximum of $1.99 million….I split the difference..and put rentals of $1.80 million…..if in fact it was closer to $1.99 million…then Falworth would have been a $100 million adjusted hit. Maybe one day those missing Variety pages will show up.

    His early 1950s movies were low budget movies that did not do too well at the box office…all the while he was a very popular face in fan magazines….as girls all over the country fell in love with him. Good information on Arrowhead and Houdini. I think you mentioned in comments that not having a Curtis page was diminishing the website……hopefully the website has bounced back in your eyes…now that we have a Curtis page….lol.

    As always…thanks for the feedback.

    1. HI BRUCE

      1 If I gave the impression that I regarded your site as “diminished” in any way at any time I apologise because that would be untrue and uncharitable as you have given us all so much valuable information and stats. Maybe I was winding you up or was so keen for a Curtis page that I phrased matters badly. Anyway all that’s academic now as I have my treasured Curtis page and your addition conjecture about Black Shield’s gross is very interesting.

      2 Your confirmation that Black Shield was likely a big hit is reinforced by para 6 of Your Possibly Interesting Facts which notes that Tony entered Quigley for the 1st time in 1954 the year of Black Shield of Falworth. Janet was never more lovely than in that movie in which her then real life husband played a peasant [wink, wink] called Myles of Crosbey- Dale who finds out that he is actually the son of a nobleman and can therefore marry in the movie the aristocratic Janet. They don’t make em like that anymore!

      3 And “do I dream or do I doubt, do mine eyes deceive me? Are things what they seem or are visions about?” Para 7 of Pos Interesting Facts appears to acknowledges that billing can be important. You will need to be careful that John doesn’t decide to shun your site !

      1. Hey Bob….I figured you would enjoy that “billing” fact….when I read it…I immediately thought of you. Tony Curtis had a very good year….but he was not able to maintain it….actually it took strong co-leads to propel to even greater glory.

        As for your earlier Curtis comments…I think they were along the lines of ….”Curtis is one of the last remaining stars not to have a page”…a truth…so it was hard to argue with it….I think I had been carrying around his IMDb page print out in my movie book for the last 13 months.

        I think John will be ok…with me adding in a billing fact…..especially with it being a racial hurdle that got taken down.

        As always….I appreciate your feedback….and now for the first time in weeks…I go to be with all the comments caught up on…..:)

        1. BRUCE
          1 “Curtis was one of the last remaining stars not to have a page” – was that not a compliment to how greatly prolific you have been? Years ago I partnered a guy in the office who kept long hours and produced volumes of work so we nicknamed him The Workhorse. Maybe instead of El Commandant I’ll call you The Workhorse! Actually when I first joined your site I got the impression that you stayed at home all day and had plenty of time on your hands. Now whilst it is obvious W of C wears the pants I realise that you are not a house husband and it’s a great credit to you that you can do the movies stuff on top of another job. That would be beyond me as once 7pm comes my batteries go flat and the most that I can tackle are these posts which are in fact a form of recreation for me.

          2 John quite likes reference to billing when the context suits him. I think he enjoyed my Richard Burton/Lee Marvin quotes from the time when they were making the Klansman. They had never met before and although being drunks they later got on like a house on fire the first day they were introduced on the set Marvin taunted “I suppose you know I get first billing.,” to which Richard snapped back in that Churchillian voice of his
          “I suppose you know I get more money.” After that the movie off-set became one big happy cocktail bar but strangely years later neither Lee nor Richard remembered ever having met each other !!

          1. Hey Bob
            1. Well after years of running grocery stores….I did become a stay at hoime dad…but with our youngest being in school full time…WoC made me go back to work. Last year I was working part time at one of the schools last year…..this year I am working full time at that school.
            2. My free time has been severely limited since going full time….but WoC got me an I-Phone so I can stay connected during work….some days….I can not comment during work….and the comments really pile up. Other days like this one…I get a little free time to stay on the comments.
            3. The Work Horse sounds like a good nickname….my batteries start getting low around midnight…lol.
            4. Funny behind the scenes from Klansman…..they might be the best thing that came out of that movie.
            4.
            3.

  3. BRUCE
    1 This page is a fine companion piece to Steve’s excellent Curtis video The Black Shield of Falworth particularly interests me because in 1954 Universal promoted it as a big budget production and its adjusted gross of nearly $95 million seems to justify the hype at the time because none of Curtis’ stand-alone films until then had made that kind of money as is illustrated with the figures for the likes of Son of Ali Baba and the Prince who Was a Thief Here in Belfast The Black Shield of Falworth had as its supporting feature Lex Barker’s Yellow Mountain which is included in Steve’s recent Barker video.

    2 Indeed Tony’s run of early 1950s stand-alone movies were on double bills with other flicks, with for example Houdini in 1953 sharing the bill with Chuck Heston’s Arrowhead. Two movies each lasting 1 and ¾ hours in the same programme at normal ticket prices – you don’t often get that kind of value for money nowadays!

    3 Anyway whilst I can not recall specifically requesting a Curtis page I think I dropped hints in the matter and although I have mentioned that I have seen just 32 of the films listed I HAVE watched all his classics and – nostalgically! – most of his early 1950s B movies for which I have long been seeking grosses so I greatly welcome this page.

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